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David Munrow: Tragic genius who brought early music to the masses

The short but brilliant life of David Munrow blazed a trail for his passion, says Ivan Hewett.

Maestro: in all, Munrow had command of 43 musical instruments Photo: G MacDomnic/Lebrecht Music & Arts/ By 6:05PM BST 23 May 2012/Telegraph The following as can be seen is an old article as the date indicates/ Blogger Ref  https://www.youtube.com/Searle8 For most of history, the territory of what people called music didn’t extend very far. It consisted, by and large, of the sounds and styles they grew up with. Anything else was a barbaric noise. Now, the territory seems endless. It stretches outwards to “ethnic” non-Western instruments and beyond them to electronic sound. And part of the reason we can stroll round this infinity with such insouciance is that a handful of explorers got there first. They mapped the territory, captured the sounds, and made them available to armchair explorers back home. One of these intrepid souls was David Munrow. His particular…

David Munrow "...There will never be another"

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Blogger Ref   https://www.youtube.com/Searle8






The following is a pleasant, and wonderful presentation of some of the recorder work of David Munrow....








http://wwno.org/post/continuum-art-recorder-1












Ancestral Voices

Wednesday, 11 February 2015
Genre: Education / Music/Source Curious British Telly
Channel: BBC2

Transmission: 17/05/1976 - 14/06/1976

Believe it or not, but there was actually a time when Curious British Telly's life wasn't consumed entirely by archive television.

It was merely a passion which would briefly manifest itself when we watched old episodes of Dr Who and tried to remember that children's tv show about the artistic dog.

You see, our obsession before this glorious folly was... MUSIC!

We'd attend gigs regularly, bought NME every single week for 9 years and even started a few fan sites on Geocities.

The passion for us, fuelled by our teenage desire to be hip and cool, gradually faded, but for the people involved in Ancestral Voices music was a way of life.

Melodies from the Past
With an amazing title that sounds like the greatest Led Zeppelin album never recorded, Ancestral Voices was the BBC's attempt to educate the masses about the history of music.

Sure, everyone lo…

Instruments Imitating Voices...Voices Imitating Instruments.....

The Early Music Consort of London a Vicenza - 1974

A Treasury of Early Music  http://www.youtube.com/Searle8



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6xaQRQpVic&t=18s


Thanks to Stefano Dal Cortivo for the above link

The following is in Italian as an English version is unavailable at present

Published on 12 Feb 2017
Musica alle corti d’Inghilterra dai Plantageneti agli Stuart.
Il programma, come dice il titolo, ha una sua precisa qualificazione. Si tratta di musiche fra il XII e il XVII secolo, eseguite in Inghilterra alle Corti di Riccardo I, Enrico V, Enrico VIII, Elisabetta I, Giacomo I e Carlo I. Ricorrono così, accanto ai nomi degli strumenti antichi - quali il liuto, la viola da gamba, la tromba medievale, il cromorno, la ribeca, la citola, la dulciana, il cembalo, ecc. - i nomi delle celebri dinastie inglesi quali Tudor, Stuart, Plantageneti e Lancaster.
E tra gli autori spiccano proprio alcuni Sovrani che scrissero musiche eseguite poi nelle feste a Corte. Infatti di Carlo I Stuart avremo l'aria «Guarda la purpurea aurora»; di E…

The Semibrevity Article

Semibrevity is an important blog on the early pioneers of Early Music. See
http://www.semibrevity.com/2016/04/nikolaus-harnoncourt-and-gustav-leonhardt-a-musical-friendship-of-more-than-60-years/




Guest Blogger: Peter Dickinson is a composer, writer and pianist and an Emeritus Professor of two universities – Keele and London. See here for more details.
‘My wife and I first met David and Gill Munrow in Cambridge in about 1965. It was summer and we were all in the garden at 54 Bateman Street, the home of Mary Potts, whose late husband was L. J. Potts, the literary critic and English don at Queens’ College.
Mary Potts had a very special role in the early music revival which has not been acknowledged [other than in this Semibrevity blog post]. A mere mention of her more distinguished pupils, who included Christopher Hogwood, Colin Tilney and Peter Williams, is enough to indicate that she ought to be better known now. She knew harpsichordists of international reputation such as Gustav Leonha…

From the archive: David Munrow profile - 'not even Mick Jagger has such versatile lips'

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A Treasury of Early Music  http://youtube.com/Searle8







9 March 1971/The Guardian.     Meirion Bowen on the scholar, virtuosic musician and crumhorn whizzkid at the forefront of the period-instrument movement, who died tragically young 40 years ago